Archive of ‘Professional Learning’ category

Leadership for Teacher Learning – D Wiliam

5 principles of teacher learning have appeared to be especially important:

choice

flexibility

small steps

accountability

support

(Wiliam, 2007)

 

For leaders, four aspects to the creation of supportive accountability:

1. Creating expectations for continually improving practice

2. Keeping the focus on the things that make a difference to students

3. Providing the time, space, dispensation, and support for innovation

4. Supporting risk-taking

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Using data

Dylan Wiliam – decision driven data collection

– data driven decision making

I can see the utility of both of these. Use PAT-M, NAPLAN data to decide on key aspects to focus on for cohorts, year levels, individuals, and then decide what formative assessment processes need to be set up during instruction. Use this formative assessment to inform and adapt instruction.

Guttman Chart used to identify Zones of Proximal Development. Needs to be explored more.

Dylan Wiliam Teacher practice implied in STEM course, involved students being directed to/or self selecting various activities depending on their level – practice/ recall, apply, analyse, evaluate/ create.

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Students Posing Questions

This year I have made a deliberate effort to encourage students to pose more questions, believing that this gives me a better insight into students’ thinking. On Friday, during a Geography lesson, I saw the benefits of this. In planning the lesson I had decided to model reading the climate statistics of Adelaide, so that students could then explore the climate statistics of their chosen country.

I presented the following table and graph:

I had planned to pose questions like:

  • What is the highest average maximum temperature? When does this occur?
  • What is the lowest average maximum temperature? When does this occur?
  • What is the average rainfall for June?
  • etc.

Instead I referred to the data and got students to pose the questions. They asked much higher order questions, such as:

  • Who collects the data? – Do they record accurately or can they manipulate the data if they are climate sceptics? (This wasn’t worded in this way, but it was what they were getting at.)
  • How accurate is the data?
  • What is the area related to the rainfall? How does this affect the data collected?
  • Has there been major differences between the climate each year?
  • After looking at the average temperatures, and knowing that the temperature can be much higher than these in Adelaide, one student thought that the statistics may be different if the last few years’ data was used, rather than the previous 30 years.
  • Is the data reliable?
  • When was it recorded?
  • Who recorded it?
  • Why is January the hottest month and has more rainfall than February? – February is usually hotter isn’t it?
  • Why does the minimum temperature follow the maximum? (Recognition of pattern)
  • Why does June have the highest rainfall?

I will continue to encourage students to pose and answer their own and others’ questions.

What sort of questions are your students posing?

What does this show you about their thinking?

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Differentiating for Learning in STEM Teaching

Differentiation can occur in regard to:

  1. outcome
  2. intervention – role of adults and students
  3. journey – how
  4. process – ways of access

Frameworks  – useful reference points

  1. Blooms Taxonomy
  2. SOLO Taxonomy – Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes

These structures/ quadrants can be used to allow students to choose a suitable pathway forward, depending on their current level of understanding.

  1. Quadrants
    1. Identify 2. Explain
    3. Use… 4. Draw your own…
  2. PACE
    P A C E
    Practice  Apply Correct Extend
    Double my number using cubes

    Solve the word problem on your table.

    Do it using a different method.

    Double muddle! Correct my mistakes.

    Investigate!

    Gold coins are doubling in the pirate chest.

Planning

Using scaffolds – (providing floors not ceilings!) – structure thinking to make meaning

Thinking organisers

  1. True/False cards
  2. Card sorts
  3. Venn diagrams
  4. Double Bubble
  5. SOLO Maps
  6. Hexagons – connect concepts through the use of subject specific vocabulary

Graphic Organisers

Blooms Taxonomy Cognitive Level Type of Activity Thinking Organiser Thumbnail
Remember Define/ Name Mind Map
Understand Explain Concept Map
Apply Sequence/ Sort Flow Chart
Apply Sequence/ Sort T-Chart
Analyse Compare/ Contrast Double Bubble
Analyse Compare/ Contrast Venn Diagram
Evaluate and Create Cause and Effect Fishbone

Through listening to the discussion generated by students working in pairs/ groups on these scaffolds teachers can make judgements about misconceptions/ further challenges needed. Questioning students to build on their ideas, and then allowing time, directing them to resources and peers who can help them, without just explaining answers, can empower students more. Also expecting students to respond orally in fully developed sentences, using appropriate vocabulary, will provide practice for more developed written responses.

 

Help Desk

A space which students can go to to access further resources/ support structures,

E.g.

  • key word lists
  • technoloical support, devices – ipads, tablets, computers
  • text books/ revision guides
  • questions
  • worksheets
  • graphic organisers
  • sentence stems

These can be utilised individual or in pairs.

 

The aim is to enable all learners, including ourselves, to improve.

 

 

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