Archive of ‘Assessment’ category

Using data

Dylan Wiliam – decision driven data collection

– data driven decision making

I can see the utility of both of these. Use PAT-M, NAPLAN data to decide on key aspects to focus on for cohorts, year levels, individuals, and then decide what formative assessment processes need to be set up during instruction. Use this formative assessment to inform and adapt instruction.

Guttman Chart used to identify Zones of Proximal Development. Needs to be explored more.

Dylan Wiliam Teacher practice implied in STEM course, involved students being directed to/or self selecting various activities depending on their level – practice/ recall, apply, analyse, evaluate/ create.

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Ten Principles of Assessment – D Wiliam

Assessment:

  1. is part of effective learning
  2. focuses on how students learn
  3. is central to classroom practice
  4. is a key professional skill
  5. is sensitive and constrictive
  6. fosters motivation
  7. promotes understanding of goals and criteria
  8. helps learners know how to improve
  9. develops the capacity for self assessment
  10. recognises all educational achievement

Assessment Reform Group 2002

 

What would you like to add/ take away/ change from this list?

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8 Reflective Questions to Help Any Student Think About Their Learning – Teachthought blog

1. What surprised you today, and why?
2. What’s the most important thing you learned today? Why do you think so?
3. What do you want to learn more about, and why?
4. When were you the most creative, and why do you think that is?
5. What made you curious today? How does learning feel different you’re curious?
6. When were you at your best today, and why?
7. (Assuming we were studying the same thing and you could decide and have access to anything), where would you start tomorrow? Why?
8. What can/ should you do with what you know?

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Students Posing Questions

This year I have made a deliberate effort to encourage students to pose more questions, believing that this gives me a better insight into students’ thinking. On Friday, during a Geography lesson, I saw the benefits of this. In planning the lesson I had decided to model reading the climate statistics of Adelaide, so that students could then explore the climate statistics of their chosen country.

I presented the following table and graph:

I had planned to pose questions like:

  • What is the highest average maximum temperature? When does this occur?
  • What is the lowest average maximum temperature? When does this occur?
  • What is the average rainfall for June?
  • etc.

Instead I referred to the data and got students to pose the questions. They asked much higher order questions, such as:

  • Who collects the data? – Do they record accurately or can they manipulate the data if they are climate sceptics? (This wasn’t worded in this way, but it was what they were getting at.)
  • How accurate is the data?
  • What is the area related to the rainfall? How does this affect the data collected?
  • Has there been major differences between the climate each year?
  • After looking at the average temperatures, and knowing that the temperature can be much higher than these in Adelaide, one student thought that the statistics may be different if the last few years’ data was used, rather than the previous 30 years.
  • Is the data reliable?
  • When was it recorded?
  • Who recorded it?
  • Why is January the hottest month and has more rainfall than February? – February is usually hotter isn’t it?
  • Why does the minimum temperature follow the maximum? (Recognition of pattern)
  • Why does June have the highest rainfall?

I will continue to encourage students to pose and answer their own and others’ questions.

What sort of questions are your students posing?

What does this show you about their thinking?

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Assessment into Practice – Understanding assessment practice to improve students’ literacy learning – H Fehring PETAA

Working in a system of standards-referenced assessment: traversing the intersections – Lenore Adie

Unit planning – Intended Learning clearly articulated

SOLO – standards clear A, B, C, etc

Success criteria clear to students – They can then use these to self assess

Questioning

What did you learn?

How do you know you learned it?

What got in the way of your learning?

What helped your learning?

How do you feel?

What can I do to help you?

 

Hinge-point questions

 

Feedback

Level Example Feedback
Task You need to include more descriptive adjectives
Process You need to work with your writing buddy to edit this piece of work looking for places to include more descriptive adjectives
Self-regulation You already know the key features of the opening of an argument. Check to see whether you have incorporated them in your first paragraph.
Self Well done!

 

Bringing it all together

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