8 Reflective Questions to Help Any Student Think About Their Learning – Teachthought blog

1. What surprised you today, and why?
2. What’s the most important thing you learned today? Why do you think so?
3. What do you want to learn more about, and why?
4. When were you the most creative, and why do you think that is?
5. What made you curious today? How does learning feel different you’re curious?
6. When were you at your best today, and why?
7. (Assuming we were studying the same thing and you could decide and have access to anything), where would you start tomorrow? Why?
8. What can/ should you do with what you know?

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Paragraphs – a Rubric

Rating Descriptions
0 – The use of cohesive devices is limited, making it difficult for the reader to follow the line of argument.

1 – The writer has followed a clear structure, but needs to deal with a single topic/ idea in each one. More connectives (e.g. in other words, consequently, finally, furthermore, for example, on the other hand) will also make the text more cohesive.

2 – The writer has followed a clear structure in each paragraph, using openers, closers and connectives effectively, and each paragraph deals with a single topic/ idea. Work at the sentence level (theme at the beginning of sentence) and at the word level (antonyms, synonyms, repetition) will help to make this text more cohesive.

3 – The structure, paragraphs, sentences, vocabulary, and use of connectives make this a very cohesive and coherent text so that the reader could easily follow the line of argument and be persuaded.

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School Discipline, Classroom Management and student Self-Management – Knoff

A Service Delivery Continuum


Assistive supports – specialised equipment, technologies, medical or physical devices, and other resources that help students

Remediation – strategies that teach students specific, usually prerequisite, skills to help them master broader curricular, scope and sequence, or benchmark objectives

Accommodations – change conditions that support student learning – such as the classroom setting or setup, how and where instruction is presented, the length of instruction, the length or time frame for assignments, or how students are expected to respond to questions or complete assignments.

Modifications – involve changes in curricular content – it’s scope, depth, breadth, or complexity

If target students don’t respond more significant or complex approaches from the next areas may be needed:

Strategic interventions – focus on changing students’ specific academic skills or strategies, their motivation, or their ability to comprehend, apply, analyse, synthesise, or evaluate academic content and material. Strategic interventions typically involve multidisciplinary assessments.

Compensatory Approaches- help students to compensate for disabilities that cannot be changed or overcome

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Students Posing Questions

This year I have made a deliberate effort to encourage students to pose more questions, believing that this gives me a better insight into students’ thinking. On Friday, during a Geography lesson, I saw the benefits of this. In planning the lesson I had decided to model reading the climate statistics of Adelaide, so that students could then explore the climate statistics of their chosen country.

I presented the following table and graph:

I had planned to pose questions like:

  • What is the highest average maximum temperature? When does this occur?
  • What is the lowest average maximum temperature? When does this occur?
  • What is the average rainfall for June?
  • etc.

Instead I referred to the data and got students to pose the questions. They asked much higher order questions, such as:

  • Who collects the data? – Do they record accurately or can they manipulate the data if they are climate sceptics? (This wasn’t worded in this way, but it was what they were getting at.)
  • How accurate is the data?
  • What is the area related to the rainfall? How does this affect the data collected?
  • Has there been major differences between the climate each year?
  • After looking at the average temperatures, and knowing that the temperature can be much higher than these in Adelaide, one student thought that the statistics may be different if the last few years’ data was used, rather than the previous 30 years.
  • Is the data reliable?
  • When was it recorded?
  • Who recorded it?
  • Why is January the hottest month and has more rainfall than February? – February is usually hotter isn’t it?
  • Why does the minimum temperature follow the maximum? (Recognition of pattern)
  • Why does June have the highest rainfall?

I will continue to encourage students to pose and answer their own and others’ questions.

What sort of questions are your students posing?

What does this show you about their thinking?

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