Routines and Ways of Working – to establish in the first few weeks of school (Year 7 2017)

Ways of working

Questioning to get to deeper levels of thinking

  • posing and answering – orally and in writing
  • exit passes
  • reflections

Thinking – visibly

  • ABCD
  • Thumbs/ fingers
  • mini-whiteboards
  • Plickers

-deeply

  • Piggy backing
  • clarifying question
  • justifying
  • giving examples

Making mistakes as a positive part of learning process

Recording

  • neat, legible, margin – for feedback
  • Cornell Note Taking System – to develop key word note taking, heading and questions, and summarising

SOLO

  • develop self assessment and peer assessment against criteria

Goal Setting

  • ease of reference
  • monitoring
  • evaluating

DRAFT (acronym to develop better sentence structure)

  • delete
  • rearrange
  • add connectors
  • form new verb endings
  • talk it out

Social skills

Above the line/ Below the line behaviours

  • What do you want to see, hear, feel in/ about/ from your peers?
  • What are some things you don’t want to see, hear, feel about your peers?

POOCH

  • Problem, Options, Outcomes, Choice. How did it go?

Routines

Vocabulary development

  • Word Wall – included in oral explanations – written

Everyone participating in discussion as much as possible

  • monitor
  • “__________what do you think?”
  • “Can you give an example_________?”

Peer support, constructive criticism

Geography

  • Distribution of resources and packing up
  • Cornell Note Taking system
  • Developing writing along the Register Continuum
  • Explore writing styles – in texts we read, including graphs, diagrams, captions, etc.

 

Maths

  • Mental Routine
    • whiteboard markers and cloths to erase
  • Number Talks
    • draw representations to match student’s descriptions
  • Structure to meet needs of students
    • Recall, Apply, Analyse, Evaluate/ Create
    • Help Desk
  • Secret Code strategies
    • used to describe processes used
  • Subitising – expanded

Reading

Pose questions

Answer with

  • explanation
  • justification
  • relate to other ideas/ situations
Here Hidden Head Heart
who how why personal judgement
where characters
when situation
author’s style
author’s message

 

 

 

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A Closer Look at Spelling in the Primary Classroom – G Oakley, J Fellowes, PETAA

Notes:

Spelling is not learned by rote or by immersion in writing and reading experiences.

Spelling is learned through:

  • the strategic use of knowledge about
    • Phonology – sound structure
    • Orthography – written symbols to represent spoken language
    • Morphology – smallest parts of words that carry meaning
    • Etymology – origin of words
  • visual activity – memory
  • metalanguage
    • phoneme
    • syllable
    • affixes
    • morpheme – units of meaning, base, root words, prefixes, suffixes
  • spelling system
  • generalisations
  • integration with the teaching of phonological awareness, phonics, word study, vocabulary, writing and reading.

Components of Phonological Awareness:

A Comprehensive Model of Spelling for Educators

Motivation and willingness to engage is influenced by quality of the learning environment, characterised by:

  • meaningful
  • ‘real life’ significance
  • reasonable level of challenge

Instruction needs to:

  • be related to writing and it’s role in effective communication.
  • involve students in group work
  • involve solving word problems
  • build a community of spellers who know how to research and use words for authentic purposes
  • see the teacher taking an important role in modelling and inspiring a passion about words and their value as tools for communication

Differentiation will be needed to meet the students’ range of needs.

“It would be a waste of everybody’s time if they were all expected to learn the same words, strategies and skills.”

To differentiate consider:

  • readiness
  • interest
  • learning profile

To assess readiness the Words Their Way test can be used as a pre-assessment.

Content

  • high frequency word lists
  • words of interest to student
  • words that the teacher has noticed the student trying to spell in writing
  • words that contain features that the students needs to practise
  • words from topics that are being covered across the curriculum

“Having students work through a commercial workbook, at their own pace, does not constitute differentiated teaching.”

 

7 Goals for Differentiation in the Classroom – Heacox 2002

  1. Develop challenging and engaging tasks for each learner.
  2. Develop instructional activities based on essential topics and concepts, processes and skills, and differentiated ways of displaying learning.
  3. Provide flexible approaches to content instruction and products.
  4. Respond to students’ readiness, instructional needs, interests, and learning preferences.
  5. Provide opportunities for students to work in various instructional formats.
  6. Meet curriculum standards and requirements for each learner.
  7. Establish learner-responsive, teacher-facilitated classrooms.

Recommended sequence for teaching sound-letter correspondence.

Spelling Sequence 1

Spelling Sequence 2

Sources of Knowledge

Phonological Knowledge

  • syllables
  • rhyme
  • onset-rhyme
  • phonemes
  • phonemic manipulation
  • word pronumciation
  • segmenting words into syllables, phonemes or morphemes

Orthographic Knowledge

  • sound-letter relationship
  • common spelling patterns/ letter sequences
  • rules for positioning of letter in words

Morphological Knowledge

  • free and bound morphemes
  • root and base words
  • prefixes and suffixes; included inflected endings
  • word derivations
  • rules and generalisations regarding adding suffixes
  • compound words
  • homonyms

Suggested sequence for introducing morphemes Table 4.4 page 76

Visual perception problems

http://www.thevisiontherapycenter.com/discovering-vision-therapy/bid/81695/Spelling-Difficulties-in-Students-Caused-by-Vision-Problems

Word Consciousness

  • interested in words
  • being aware of words and their parts
  • curious and motivated to learn

Spelling is a thinking process not a rote learning task.

Spelling Strategy posters:

  • Sound it out
  • Does it look right?
  • Spell by meaning
  • Consulting an authority
  • Analogy
  • Spell by rule
  • Mnemonics

Technology based interventions:

  • Phonics Alive – Advanced Software
  • Clicker Phonics
  • Fast Forward – (Fairly costly but developed by neuroscientists)
  • Aerobics by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Wordshark 5 by White Space Ltd
  • Apps
    • Hearbuilder
    • Prof’s Phonics 1
    • Alpha Writer
  • Plickers – using a game called ‘You can join my game’

Use data about where your students are at to determine needs and address these.

Assessment is an important tool to do this.

Explicit teaching of

  • Language
    • phoneme
    • syllable
    • morpheme
    • suffix
    • affix
    • baseword
    • prefix
    • rootword
    • compound
    • homophone
    • homonym
  • Strategies
  • Phonological Knowledge
  • Orthographic Knowledge
  • Morphological Knowledge
  • Etymological Knowledge

Summary:

Characteristics of an effective Spelling Program:

  • Regular assessment – data analysis indicating growth
  • Differentiated practices
    • word lists
    • choices in activities/ ways of working depending on needs and interests
  • Goal setting and regular monitoring with high student involvement in these processes
  • Metalanguage developed
  • Students increasingly developing vocabulary to describe strategies and thinking processes used
  • Learning applied to writing
  • Sense of fun, wonder, challenge experienced
  • Games, challenges as a class
  • Curriculum standards addressed and achieved
  • students increasingly able to articulate their learning, explaining patterns and generalisations and appropriately applying these
  • Evidence shows development – what students say, write, do and make reflected on skills/ knowledge continuum (may not be linear)
  • Intervention strategies implemented for cohorts/ individuals as necessary with support of SSO, parent, peer tutor, regular time with the teacher – tied to goals which are time bound and reviewed to measure effectiveness of processes used.
  • Further assessment sought/ referred if intervention not successful
    • technological tools could be useful (Phonics Alive, Apps, Text to speech (coping strategy)
  • Students use their knowledge and skills strategically to spell increasingly proficiently
    • phonological knowledge
    • orthographical knowledge
    • morphological knowledge
    • etymological knowledge
    • apply strategies for how to spell unknown words
      • sound
      • sight
      • meaning
      • rules
      • mnemonics
      • authority
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Assessment into Practice – Understanding assessment practice to improve students’ literacy learning – H Fehring PETAA

Working in a system of standards-referenced assessment: traversing the intersections – Lenore Adie

Unit planning – Intended Learning clearly articulated

SOLO – standards clear A, B, C, etc

Success criteria clear to students – They can then use these to self assess

Questioning

What did you learn?

How do you know you learned it?

What got in the way of your learning?

What helped your learning?

How do you feel?

What can I do to help you?

 

Hinge-point questions

 

Feedback

Level Example Feedback
Task You need to include more descriptive adjectives
Process You need to work with your writing buddy to edit this piece of work looking for places to include more descriptive adjectives
Self-regulation You already know the key features of the opening of an argument. Check to see whether you have incorporated them in your first paragraph.
Self Well done!

 

Bringing it all together

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More STEM Resources

triple-science-guide_assessment-for-learningThe Association for Achievement and Improvement through Assessment
https://www.aaia.org.uk

Dylan Wiliam’s Website
http://www.dylanwiliam.org/Dylan_Wiliams_website/Welcome.html

Education and Endowment Fund
https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/resources/teaching-learning-toolkit

Learning Sciences – Dylan Wiliam Centre
http://www.dylanwiliamcenter.com

National STEM Learning Centre
https://www.stem.org.uk/resources

Further Reading/ Resources
http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/nov05/vol63/num03/Classroom-Assessment@-Minute-by-Minute,-Day-by-Day.aspx

http://www.ascd.org/Publications/Books/Overview/Checking-for-Understanding-Formative-Assessment-Techniques-for-Your-Classroom-2nd-Edition.aspx

Assessment For Learning
https://www.stem.org.uk/elibrary/resource/76992?utm_source=Future%20Learn&utm_campaign=AfL%20Assessment%20for%20learning&utm_medium=Web%20link

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STEM Resources

Electric Circuits
https://www.stem.org.uk/elibrary/resource/30937?utm_source=Future%20Learn&utm_campaign=AfL%20Electrical%20Circuits&utm_medium=Web%20link

P-O-E Formative Assessment
Prediction – Evidence – Observation
https://stultzjn.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/keeley-2013_poe-formative-assessment.pdf

Thinking about Learning
https://www.stem.org.uk/elibrary/collection/2934?utm_source=Future%20Learn&utm_campaign=AfL%20Thinking%20about%20Learning&utm_medium=Web%20link

Hinge Point Questions – Resources
https://www.stem.org.uk/elibrary/community-resource/238464/selected-resources-used-assessment-learning-stem-teaching-mooc

Google Doc – Hinge point questions
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1_jfHmFhw2dIzIPM-EHwulPTcRDB3Exa0OZAK4lxMdmk/viewanalytics

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1CPRGUQ9XnrXQO9xUyRoedhQAdkpRq2u-IzOYywxq8zc/viewanalytics

Discussion Group
https://www.stem.org.uk/community/groups/37435/assessment-for-learning-in-stem-teaching

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Digital Storytelling

7 Elements of Digital Storytelling

1. Point of View
2. A dramatic question
3. Emotional content
4. The gift of your voice
5. The Power of the Soundtrack
6. Economy
7. Pacing

3 types
* personal narratives
* historical documentaries
* content area stories

12 Lessons:
1. Recognise characteristics of good digital storytelling
2. Consider audience and purpose
3. personal point of view
4. provide support feedback to the scripts of others – be helpful and friendly
5. use high quality images to support the story – large size, own images, or free to use/ modify
6. file image using meaningful names
7. create a detailed storyboard before creating digital story
8. Carefully organise all elements in one location
– create sub folders
– audio
– script
– pictures
– music
9. save files early and often – computer and back up, keep originals, make copies and edit (music and voice recording)
10. Record high quality narration – USB microphone, Audacity, Smartphone and then email file, quiet are – no background noise
11. Consider copyright
12. Collect/ create educational material to support digital story

Assessment and Evaluation
Grading rubric
Story circle and rubric
Self Reflection/ Assessment e.g.

What was the topic and why did you chose this?
What technology hardware and software did you use?
What type of content did you use in creating your digital story?
What were some of the challenges you faced creating the project?
Briefly describe the instructional support materials you created?
What were some of the most significant things you learned?
Do you think you will use digital storytelling in the future?

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Differentiation for Learning in STEM Teaching

Carol Dweck: Mindset Interview

Carol Dweck: The Growth Mindset

Carol Dweck – A Study on Praise and Mindsets

DweckEducationWeek

Recommended Reading
General/practitioner readership
Brown, Roediger, & McDaniel: Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning (2014)
Burnett: The Idiot Brain: A Neuroscientist Explains What Your Head is Really Up To (2016)
Carey: How we learn (2015)
Didau: What if everything you knew about education was wrong? (2015)
Dweck: Mindset How We Can Learn To Fulfil Our Potential (2012)
Hymer & Gershon: Growth Mindset Pocketbook (2014)
Marzano, Pickering & Pollock: Classroom Instruction that Works (2004)
Sousa & Tomlinson: Differentiation and the Brain (2010)
Tomlinson: The Differentiated Classroom (2014)
Willingham: Why don’t students like school (2010)
Wiliam & Leahy: Embedding Formative Assessment (2015)

Technical/academic readership
Dweck: Self-theories Their Role in Motivation, Personality and Development (2000)
Dunlosky, Rawson, Marsh, Nathan & Willingham: Improving students’ learning with effective learning techniques: Promising directions from cognitive and educational psychology Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 14(1), 4-58 (2013)
Pashler, McDaniel, Rohrer & Bjork: Learning styles: Concepts and evidence Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 9(3), 105-119 (2008)
Hall, T., Strangman, N., & Meyer, A. Differentiated instruction and implications for UDL implementation Wakefield, MA: National Center on Accessing the General Curriculum (2003)

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Differentiating for Learning in STEM Teaching

Differentiation can occur in regard to:

  1. outcome
  2. intervention – role of adults and students
  3. journey – how
  4. process – ways of access

Frameworks  – useful reference points

  1. Blooms Taxonomy
  2. SOLO Taxonomy – Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes

These structures/ quadrants can be used to allow students to choose a suitable pathway forward, depending on their current level of understanding.

  1. Quadrants
    1. Identify 2. Explain
    3. Use… 4. Draw your own…
  2. PACE
    P A C E
    Practice  Apply Correct Extend
    Double my number using cubes

    Solve the word problem on your table.

    Do it using a different method.

    Double muddle! Correct my mistakes.

    Investigate!

    Gold coins are doubling in the pirate chest.

Planning

Using scaffolds – (providing floors not ceilings!) – structure thinking to make meaning

Thinking organisers

  1. True/False cards
  2. Card sorts
  3. Venn diagrams
  4. Double Bubble
  5. SOLO Maps
  6. Hexagons – connect concepts through the use of subject specific vocabulary

Graphic Organisers

Blooms Taxonomy Cognitive Level Type of Activity Thinking Organiser Thumbnail
Remember Define/ Name Mind Map
Understand Explain Concept Map
Apply Sequence/ Sort Flow Chart
Apply Sequence/ Sort T-Chart
Analyse Compare/ Contrast Double Bubble
Analyse Compare/ Contrast Venn Diagram
Evaluate and Create Cause and Effect Fishbone

Through listening to the discussion generated by students working in pairs/ groups on these scaffolds teachers can make judgements about misconceptions/ further challenges needed. Questioning students to build on their ideas, and then allowing time, directing them to resources and peers who can help them, without just explaining answers, can empower students more. Also expecting students to respond orally in fully developed sentences, using appropriate vocabulary, will provide practice for more developed written responses.

 

Help Desk

A space which students can go to to access further resources/ support structures,

E.g.

  • key word lists
  • technoloical support, devices – ipads, tablets, computers
  • text books/ revision guides
  • questions
  • worksheets
  • graphic organisers
  • sentence stems

These can be utilised individual or in pairs.

 

The aim is to enable all learners, including ourselves, to improve.

 

 

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